Understanding Sacrifice and Preserving War Stories

September 13, 2018

How can we experience the emotional impact of history and pass on stories of heroes for younger generations? Ryan Kaiser is a Social Studies teacher at The Mt. Washington School, whose class participates in Maryland Humanities’ Maryland History Day. Through a program called Understanding Sacrifice, he traveled to the Philippines to learn more about World War II and read the eulogy of a fallen soldier.

00:0000:00

The Maryland Odyssey Project

September 6, 2018

Last year, Emily Wilson became the first woman to translate Homer’s Odyssey into English. Public high school students in Anne Arundel County, Baltimore City, and Baltimore County will learn about Ancient Greek history and society and create their own poetry, history projects, and theatre pieces in response to this translation. Amy Bernstein, the Project Director, tells us more about the project, a Maryland Humanities grantee.

00:0000:00

Urban Planning History and Park Access in Druid Hill Park

August 30, 2018

How can planning with a focus on automobile transportation impact residents of a city? Graham Coreil-Allen, a public artist in Baltimore, dives into the history of Druid Hill Park’s infrastructure and the effect on African-American and Jewish residents. He talks about the lasting effects of the planning in the neighborhood, the need for physical access to the park for people who do not drive, and his efforts to increase that access.

00:0000:00

The Humanities and Young Baltimoreans

August 23, 2018

Published in LA Weekly and Ms. Magazine, Baltimore native Jordannah Elizabeth returned home to teach after the Baltimore uprising. She talks about the impact of her mother instilling a love for reading at a young age, her love for the humanities, and their value for a young person in Baltimore City. 

00:0000:00

Exploring and Preserving African American History Through Dance

August 15, 2018

 How can we trace cultural history through dance? What can dance tell us about belonging to a culture or nation? Breai Mason-Campbell from Guardian Baltimore, a dance cooperative that performs, preserves and passes on African American folk traditions, tells us more.

00:0000:00

Humanism in Archaeology

August 9, 2018
We know archaeology connects us to the past, but how does it reveal the humanity of our ancestors? Jane Cox, Chief of Historic Preservation for Anne Arundel County and Board Member for the Lost Towns Project, an Anne Arundel County-based nonprofit and recent Maryland Humanities grantee, tells us more.
00:0000:00

Early Music in Western Maryland

July 26, 2018

Did you know that bluegrass has origins outside of the United States? Pat Nordstrom from Mountainside Baroque, an early music collective based in Western Maryland and Maryland Humanities grantee, tells us more.

00:0000:00

Odyssey: Jack Whitten Sculpture

July 19, 2018

2016 National Medal of Arts honoree, Jack Whitten, is best known for his paintings. This may be because his sculptures have never been visible to the public until now.  The sculptures — inspired by the materials and traditions of Africa and ancient Greece — are now on view at the Baltimore Museum of Art in the exhibition Odyssey: Jack Whitten Sculpture.  Kevin Tervala, the museum’s Associate Curator of African Art, tells us more about the artist and the exhibition.

00:0000:00

How Civic Engagement Shaped Laurel, Maryland

July 12, 2018

How can ordinary Marylanders bring about change in their region? “We The People: How Civic Engagement Has Shaped Laurel,” the current exhibit at the Laurel Museum, delves into this question. Ann Bennett, Executive Director of the Laurel Historical Society, tells us more about the exhibit.

00:0000:00

Early Women of Architecture in Maryland

July 5, 2018

In 1925, Harvard Graduate School of Design didn’t offer women graduate degrees in architecture, but Victorine du Pont Homsey completed a certificate program with the same curriculum and professors. The Early Women of Architecture in Maryland exhibit, now at Dorchester Center for the Arts, features du Pont Homsey and 11 other women. The exhibit was supported in part by a grant from Maryland Humanities in 2015. Jillian Storms, curator of the exhibit and Board Member at the American Institute of Architecture’s Baltimore Chapter, tell us more about the work of Victorine du Pont Homsey and this summer’s related programming.

00:0000:00